Graduation Cohort Rate

Posted: Thu, 10/20/2011 - 4:10pm Updated: Tue, 04/15/2014 - 2:40pm

An accurate measure of the high school graduation rate is a critical step toward improving high school accountability and improving our understanding of the characteristics of the population of students who do not earn regular high school diplomas or who take longer than four years to graduate. Numerous reports and statistics from the U.S. Department of Labor indicate the importance of a high school diploma. For example, in 2006, the unemployment rate for high school dropouts aged 25 and older was more than 1.5 times the rate of individuals who had a high school diploma (6.8 percent compared to 4.3 percent, respectively). Data for the same year also show that median annual earnings for high school graduates were nearly 32 percent higher than the earnings of those who did not receive a high school diploma. These data make very clear the high economic costs of not completing high school.

In August 2004, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) released a report synthesizing the recommendations of a panel of experts on graduation rate calculations. The panel recommended an adjusted cohort graduation rate as the best method for calculating the graduation rate. In 2005, the National Governors Association (NGA) Task Force on High School Graduation Rate Data also recommended that all States adopt and begin immediately taking steps to implement a standard four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate consistent with that proposed by the NCES panel.

The Indiana General Assembly was ahead of the nation. In 2003, the General Assembly passed legislation (codified at IC 20-26-13) that instructed the Department to begin using a new method for calculating high school graduation rates in 2005-06 (the first time four years of student-level data would be available), making Indiana among the first states to calculate graduation rates based on student-level information.

The formula begins by establishing a cohort (or class) of first-time freshmen that expands and contracts as students transfer in and out of school during the years that follow. Since a student never moves to a different cohort, we have an accurate measure of the percentage of students who graduate in four years or less. By publishing five and six year rates, we account for those students who persist even though they do not graduate in the standard number of years.

Indiana’s unwavering focus on the high school graduation rate is part of our goal to create and promote a statewide culture of academic excellence in which at least 90% of students graduate from high school in four years or less. This is necessary to achieve our vision that the academic achievement and career preparation of all Indiana students will be the best in the United States and on par with the most competitive countries in the world.

Graduation Rate Audit

Information regarding the 2012 Graduation Rate Audit will be released at a later time.

Indiana Code 20-26-13-12 provides that the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) shall calculate, for each public and accredited nonpublic high school, an estimated graduation rate that is determined by the total number of graduates for a particular year divided by the total number of students enrolled in Grade 9 at the school three years before that year. For any school where the difference between the estimated graduation rate and the reported four-year cohort graduation rate is more than five percent, IDOE must request the written documentation which supports removing a student from the cohort because of transfer or any of the other circumstances enumerated in IC 20-26-13-10.

For any school that cannot provide written proof supporting the removal of a student from the cohort, IDOE shall require the publication of a corrected graduation rate in the next school year's Annual Performance Report under IC 20-20-8-3.

  • 2012 Graduation Rate Audit Notification - Coming Soon
  • 2012 Graduation Rate Documentation Request - Coming Soon

Non-Waiver Graduation Rate

The non-waiver rate excludes those graduates who received a diploma with a waiver and have not met the basic expectation that all students pass the state’s Graduation Examination before exiting high school with a diploma.

Students can receive graduation waivers in three ways: 1) by successfully completing Core 40 coursework; 2) by demonstrating to the satisfaction of the high school that they have met the achievement standard measured by the Graduation Examination through other means; or, 3) by completing an internship and a workforce readiness assessment.

  • Coming Soon

2011-2012 Statutory Graduation Rate Data

General Information on Statutory Graduation Rates