Posted: Fri, 06/03/2016 - 2:49pm Updated: Fri, 05/19/2017 - 11:23am

This Teacher Resource Guide has been developed to provide supporting materials to help educators successfully implement the Indiana Academic Standards for Physics I. These resources are provided to help you in your work to ensure all students meet the rigorous learning expectations set by the Academic Standards. Use of these resources is optional – teachers should decide which resource will work best in their school for their students.

This resource document is a living document and will be frequently updated.

Please send any suggested links and report broken links to:
Jarred Corwin
Secondary Science Specialist
jcorwin@doe.in.gov

The resources, clarifying statements, and vocabulary in this document are for illustrative purposes only, to promote a base of clarity and common understanding. Each item illustrates a standard but please note that the resources, clarifying statements, and vocabulary are not intended to limit interpretation or classroom applications of the standards.

The links compiled and posted in this Resource Guide have been provided by classroom teachers, the Department of Education, and other sources. The DOE has not attempted to evaluate any posted materials. They are offered as samples for your reference only and are not intended to represent the best or only approach to any particular issue. The DOE does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of information contained on a linked website; does not endorse the views expressed or services offered by the sponsor of a linked website; and cannot authorize the use of copyrighted materials contained in linked websites. Users must request such authorization from the sponsor of the linked website.

Standard 1: Constant Velocity
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PI.1.1 Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and position of an object moving at a uniform rate and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.

Multiple web sites to explore motion and force

- Have students use this simulation to determine what happens to motion when a force is applied to an object

- Under what situations does a force not produce motion?

PI.1.2 Describe the slope of the graphical representation of position vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the velocity of the object.

Scientific slugger

out of the park physics baseball

PI.1.3 Rank the velocities of objects in a system based on the slope of a position vs. clock reading (time) graphical representation. Recognize that the magnitude of the slope representing a negative velocity can be greater than the magnitude of the slope representing a positive velocity.

Energy skate park

PI.1.4 Describe the differences between the terms “distance,” “displacement,” “speed,” “velocity,” “average speed,” and “average velocity” and be able to calculate any of those values given an object moving at a single constant velocity or with different constant velocities over a given time interval.

Angry birds in the classroom

space lessons

Standard 2: Constant Acceleration
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PI.2.1 Develop graphical, mathematical and pictorial representations (e.g. a motion map) that describe the relationship between the clock reading (time) and velocity of an object moving at a uniformly changing rate and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the motion of an object.

1 D Kinematics

Relating the shape to the motion

PI.2.2 Describe the slope of the graphical representation of velocity vs. clock reading (time) in terms of the acceleration of the object.

 

PI.2.3 Rank the accelerations of objects in a system based on the slope of a velocity vs. clock reading (time) graphical representation. Recognize that the magnitude of the slope representing a negative acceleration can be greater than the magnitude of the slope representing a positive acceleration.

The laboratory

PI.2.4 Given a graphical representation of the position, velocity, or acceleration vs. clock reading (time), be able to identify or sketch the shape of the other two graphs.

 

PI.2.5 Qualitatively and quantitatively apply the models of constant velocity and constant acceleration to determine the position or velocity of an object moving in free fall near the surface of the Earth.

 

Standards 3: Forces
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PI.3.1 Understand Newton’s first law of motion and describe the motion of an object in the absence of a net external force according to Newton’s first law.

Newtons laws of motion

Newton gravity

circles

Gravity force lab

- Gravity Force Lab. This simulation has 2 masses that are located a distance (r) away from each other. Students can change the size of the masses and the distance to see what happens to the force.

- Simulation where you can look at how objects will orbit other objects

PI.3.2 Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship among the inertial mass of an object, the total force applied and the acceleration of an object in one dimension where one or more forces is applied to the object and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how a net external force changes the motion of an object.

 

PI.3.3 Construct force diagrams using appropriately labeled vectors with magnitude, direction, and units to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze a scenario and make claims (i.e. develop arguments, justify assertions) about forces exerted on an object by other objects for different types of forces or components of forces.

Components of Velocity

Projectile Motion

Online Projectile Simulator

Practice with Vectors

PI.3.4 Understand Newton’s third law of motion and describe the interaction of two objects using Newton’s third law and the representation of action-reaction pairs of forces.

Newtons Laws of motion interactive

Newton’s Laws

PI.3.5 Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the gravitational mass of an object and the force due to gravity and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the gravitational mass will affect the force due to gravity acting on the object.

Centripetal Force Information

Centripetal Force Practice

Centripetal Force and Acceleration Videos

Universal Gravitation

Universal Gravitation 2

Universal Gravitation 3

Gravity and Orbits Simulation

Kepler’s Laws

Gravitation Videos

PI.3.6 Describe the slope of the force due to gravity vs. gravitational mass graphical representation in terms of gravitational field.

Gravity force lab

Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation

PI.3.7 Explain that the equivalence of the inertial and gravitational masses leads to the observation that acceleration in free fall is independent of an object’s mass.

Gravitational Fields Interactive

Standard 4: Energy
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PI.4.1 Evaluate the translational kinetic, gravitational potential, and elastic potential energies in simple situations using the mathematical definitions of these quantities and mathematically relate the initial and final values of the translational kinetic, gravitational potential, and elastic potential energies in the absence of a net external force.

Work:

Gravitational PE:

KE:

KE: How far will it skid?

Total Mech. Energy:

Roller Coaster Total Mech Energy animation:

Pendulum Energy Transformation:

Thermodynamics

Temperature

PI.4.2 Identify the forms of energy present in a scenario and recognize that the potential energy associated with a system of objects and is not stored in the object itself.

Work energy and power

PI.4.3 Conceptually define “work” as the process of transferring of energy into or out of a system when an object is moved under the application of an external force and operationally define “work” as the area under a force vs. change in position curve.

 

PI.4.4 For a force exerted in one or two dimensions, mathematically determine the amount of work done on a system by an unbalanced force over a change in position in one dimension.

Elab

simulation the ramp

PI.4.5 Understand and apply the principle of conservation of energy to determine the total mechanical energy stored in a closed system and mathematically show that the total mechanical energy of the system remains constant as long as no dissipative (i.e. non-conservative) forces are present.

Energy

phet

PI.4.6 Develop and apply pictorial, mathematical or graphical representations to qualitatively and quantitatively predict changes in the mechanical energy (e.g. translational kinetic, gravitational or elastic potential) of a system due to changes in position or speed of objects or non-conservative interactions within the system.

 

Standard 5: Linear Momentum In One Dimension
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PI.5.1 For an object moving at constant rate, define linear momentum as the product of an object’s mass and its velocity and be able to quantitatively determine the linear momentum of a single object.

Impulse, Momentum, and the Physics of Football

Linear Momentum

Circus Physics (linear momentum)

Collision Lab

Understanding Car Crashes

Conservation of Momentum

PI.5.2 Operationally define “impulse” as the area under a force vs. change in clock reading (time) curve and be able to determine the change in linear momentum of a system acted on by an external force. Predict the change in linear momentum of an object from the average force exerted on the object and time interval during which the force is exerted.

Impulse lab

Crash test dummy

PI.5.3 Demonstrate that when two objects interact through a collision or separation that both the force experienced by each object and change in linear momentum of each object are equal and opposite, and as the mass of an object increases, the change in velocity of that object decreases.

 

PI.5.4 Determine the individual and total linear momentum for a two-body system before and after an interaction (e.g. collision or separation) between the two objects and show that the total linear momentum of the system remains constant when no external force is applied consistent with Newton’s third law.

Impulse and Momentum Change Complete Toolkit

PI.5.5 Classify an interaction (e.g. collision or separation) between two objects as elastic or inelastic based on the change in linear kinetic energy of the system.

Collision

PI.5.6 Mathematically determine the center of mass of a system consisting of two or more masses. Given a system with no external forces applied, show that the linear momentum of the center of mass remains constant during any interaction between the masses.

Center of mass builder

phet

Standard 6: Simple Harmonic Oscillating Systems
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PI.6.1 Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the amount of stretch of a spring and the restoring force and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the stretch or compression will affect the restoring force and vice versa, specifically for an ideal spring.

Mass spring lab

Spring

PI.6.2 Describe the slope of the graphical representation of restoring force vs. change in length of an elastic material in terms of the elastic constant of the material, specifically for an ideal spring.

 

PI.6.3 Develop graphical and mathematical representations which describe the relationship between the mass, elastic constant, and period of a simple horizontal mass-spring system and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the mass or elastic constant will affect the period of the system for an ideal spring.

 

PI.6.4 Develop graphical and mathematical representations which describe the relationship between the strength of gravity, length of string, and period of a simple mass-string (i.e. pendulum) system apply the those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the length of string or strength of gravity will affect the period of the system in the limit of small amplitudes.

Pendulum lab

Pendulum 1

Pendulum

PI.6.5 Explain the limit in which the amplitude does not affect the period of a simple mass-spring (i.e. permanent deformation) or mass-string (i.e. pendulum, small angles) harmonic oscillating system.

 

Standard 7: Mechanical Waves and Sound
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PI.7.1 Differentiate between transverse and longitudinal modes of oscillation for a mechanical wave traveling in one dimension.

 

PI.7.2 Understand that a mechanical wave requires a medium to transfer energy, unlike an electromagnetic wave, and that only the energy is transferred by the mechanical wave, not the mass of the medium.

Dispersion Simulation

Color vision

PI.7.3 Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the frequency of a mechanical wave and the wavelength of the wave and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the frequency of a mechanical wave affects the wavelength and vice versa.

Tone Generator

Online sound generator

PI.7.4 Describe the slope of the graphical representation of wavelength vs. the inverse of the frequency in terms of the speed of the mechanical wave.

Sound and waves

PI.7.5 Apply the mechanical wave model to sound waves and qualitatively and quantitatively determine how the relative motion of a source and observer affects the frequency of a wave as described by the Doppler Effect.

Wave interference

PI.7.6 Qualitatively and quantitatively apply the principle of superposition to describe the interaction of two mechanical waves or pulses.

 

PI.7.7 Qualitatively describe the phenomena of both resonance frequencies and beat frequencies that arise from the interference of sound waves of slightly different frequency and define the beat frequency as the difference between the frequencies of two individual sound wave sources.

Waves and sound

Interference and Beats

Standard 8: Simple Circuit Analysis<
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PI.8.1 Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations that describe the relationship between length, cross-sectional area, and resistivity of an ohmic device and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the composition, size, or shape of the device affect the resistance.

Sticky tape activity:

electrical; charge/current etc watch your thoughts- diagnostic imaging and the brain

analyze simple arrangements: How are resistance and power related?

Students can be helped to understand the concepts of voltage and current if you always say “current through” and voltage (or potential difference) across”. Voltmeters are always placed across the device to be measured and ammeters must always be placed in series. (Ammeters can be ruined when students incorrectly place them across a device being tested.

and http://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/

Ohm's Law

Sticky Tape

PI.8.2 Describe the slope of the graphical representation of resistance vs. the ratio of length to cross-sectional area in terms of the resistivity of the material.

 

PI.8.3 Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the amount of current passing through an ohmic device and the amount of voltage (i.e. EMF) applied across the device according to Ohm’s Law and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the current affects the voltage and vice versa.

Ohms Law

PI.8.4 Describe the slope of the graphical representation of current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current in terms of the resistance of the device.

Circuit construction kit

PI.8.5 Qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the voltage or resistance of a simple series (i.e. loop) circuit affects the voltage, current and power measurements of individual resistive devices and for the entire circuit.

Circuit Builder

PI.8.6 Qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the voltage or resistance of a simple parallel (i.e. ladder) circuit affects the voltage, current and power measurements of individual resistive devices and for the entire circuit.

Parallel Circuits

PI.8.7 Apply conservation of energy concepts to the design of an experiment that will demonstrate the validity of Kirchhoff’s loop rule (∑ΔV = 0) in a circuit with only a battery and resistors either in series or in, at most, one pair of parallel branches.

 

PI.8.8 Apply conservation of electric charge (i.e. Kirchhoff’s junction rule) to the comparison of electric current in various segments of an electrical circuit with a single battery and resistors in series and in, at most, one parallel branch and predict how those values would change if configurations of the circuit are changed.

 

Possible Websites For Science: