Posted: Fri, 06/03/2016 - 2:54pm Updated: Fri, 05/19/2017 - 11:23am

This Teacher Resource Guide has been developed to provide supporting materials to help educators successfully implement the Indiana Academic Standards for Physics II. These resources are provided to help you in your work to ensure all students meet the rigorous learning expectations set by the Academic Standards. Use of these resources is optional – teachers should decide which resource will work best in their school for their students.

This resource document is a living document and will be frequently updated.

Please send any suggested links and report broken links to:
Jarred Corwin
Secondary Science Specialist
jcorwin@doe.in.gov

The resources, clarifying statements, and vocabulary in this document are for illustrative purposes only, to promote a base of clarity and common understanding. Each item illustrates a standard but please note that the resources, clarifying statements, and vocabulary are not intended to limit interpretation or classroom applications of the standards.

The links compiled and posted in this Resource Guide have been provided by classroom teachers, the Department of Education, and other sources. The DOE has not attempted to evaluate any posted materials. They are offered as samples for your reference only and are not intended to represent the best or only approach to any particular issue. The DOE does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of information contained on a linked website; does not endorse the views expressed or services offered by the sponsor of a linked website; and cannot authorize the use of copyrighted materials contained in linked websites. Users must request such authorization from the sponsor of the linked website.

Standard 1: Energy and Momentum in Two Dimensions
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PII.1.1 For a system consisting of a single object with a net external force applied, qualitatively and quantitatively predict changes in its linear momentum using the impulse-momentum theorem and in its translational kinetic energy using the work-energy theorem.

Forces and Motion simulation

- Under what situations does a force not produce motion?

PII.1.2 For a system consisting of a two objects with no net external forces applied, qualitatively and quantitatively analyze a two dimensional interaction (i.e. collision or separation) to show that the total linear momentum of the system remains constant.  
PII.1.3 For a system consisting of two objects moving in two dimensions with no net external forces applied, apply the principles of conservation of linear momentum and of mechanical energy to quantitatively predict changes in the linear momentum, velocity, and kinetic energy after the interaction between the two objects.

Work:

Gravitational PE:

KE:

KE: How far will it skid?

Total Mech. Energy:

Roller Coaster Total Mech Energy animation:

Pendulum Energy Transformation:

PII.1.4 Classify interactions between two objects moving in two dimensions as elastic, inelastic and completely inelastic.  
Standard 2: Temperature and Thermal Energy Transfer
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PII.2.1 Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship among the temperature, thermal energy, and thermal energy transfer (i.e. heat) in the kinetic molecular theory and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the temperature of a substance affects the motion of the molecules.

Heat transfer

Temperature

PII.2.2 Describe the process of the transfer of thermal energy (i.e. heat) that occurs during the heating cycle of a substance from solid to gas and relate the changes in molecular motion to temperature changes that are observed.

Entropy Demos:

1. Shuffle deck of cards which had started out ordered.

2. Fill a large clear jar with marbles or beans of equal size but of two different colors (2 layers – one on top of other). When shaken, entropy increases (just as a conductor with one hot and one cold end will reach equilibrium). Note: it takes energy to reconstruct the original configuration.

(gas model) or ItemCode=02239327 (diesel))

Gas Properties/Laws Simulation

Boyle Airplane

Lussac Airplane

temp proportional to avg KE cold car start:

PII.2.3 Cite evidence from everyday life to describe the transfer of thermal energy by conduction, convection, and radiation. Physics Heat and Thermodynamics
PII.2.4 Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship among the volume, temperature, and number of molecules of an ideal gas in a closed system and the pressure exerted by the system and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing any of those variables affects the others.

Gas Properties

Ideal Gas Law

PII.2.5 Describe the slope of the graphical representation of pressure vs. the product of: the number of particles, temperature of the gas, and inverse of the volume of the gas in terms of the ideal gas constant.

Gas Simulator

PII.2.6 Using PV graphs, qualitatively and quantitatively determine how changes in the pressure, volume or temperature of an ideal gas allow the gas to do work and classify the work as either done on or done by the gas.

Boyles

Standard 3: Fluids
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PII.3.1 For a static, incompressible fluid, develop and apply graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the density and the pressure exerted at various positions in the fluid, and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the depth or density affects the pressure. Fluid – Pressure and Flow Simulation
PII.3.2 Qualitatively and quantitatively determine how the density of fluid or volume of fluid displaced is related to the force due to buoyancy acting on either a floating or submerged object as described by Archimedes’ principle of buoyancy. Buoyancy
PII.3.3 Develop and apply the principle of constant volume flow rate to determine the relationship between cross-sectional area of a pipe and the velocity of an incompressible fluid flowing through a pipe.  
PII.3.4 Develop and apply Bernoulli’s principle and continuity equations to predict changes in the speed and pressure of a moving incompressible fluid. Bernoulli principle
PII.3.5 Describe how a change in the pressure of as static fluid in an enclosed container is transmitted equally in all directions (Pascal’s Principle) and apply Pascal’s Principle to determine the mechanical advantage of a hydraulic system.

Pascal’s Principle

Pascal’s Principle Video

Standard 4: Electricity
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PII.4.1 Describe the methods of charging an object (i.e. contact, induction and polarization) and apply the principle of conservation of charge to determine the charges on each object after charge is transferred between two objects by contact. Charging interactive
PII.4.2 For a single isolated charge, develop and apply graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the amount of charge, the distance from the charge and the strength of the electric field created by the charge and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing either the amount of charge or distance from the charge affects the strength of the electric field. Electric hockey
PII.4.3 Using Coulomb's law, pictorially and mathematically describe the force on a stationary charge due to other stationary charges. Understand that these forces are equal and opposite as described by Newton’s third law and compare and contrast the strength of this force to the force due to gravity.

Centripetal Force Information

Centripetal Force Practice

Centripetal Force and Acceleration Videos

Gravitation Videos

Universal Gravitation

Universal Gravitation 2

Universal Gravitation 3

Gravity and Orbits Simulation

Kepler’s Laws

Kepler’s Laws 2

Kepler’s Laws 3

Kepler’s Laws 4

Kepler’s Laws 5

- Gravity Force Lab.

This simulation has 2 masses that are located a distance (r) away from each other. Students can change the size of the masses and the distance to see what happens to the force.

PII.4.4 For a single isolated charge, develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the amount of charge, the distance from the charge and the electric potential created by the charge and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing either the amount of charge or distance from the charge affects the electric potential.  
PII.4.5 Map electric fields and equipotential lines, showing the electric field lines are perpendicular to the equipotential lines, and draw conclusions about the motion of a charged particle either between or along equipotential lines due the electric field.

Charges and Fields

PII.4.6 Distinguish between electric potential energy and electric potential (i.e. voltage).  
PII.4.7 Apply conservation of energy to determine changes in the electric potential energy, translational kinetic energy, and speed of a single charged object (i.e. a point particle) placed in a uniform electric field.  
Standard 5: Simple and Complex Circuits
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PII.5.1 Relate the idea of electric potential energy to electric potential (i.e. voltage) in the context of electric circuits.

electrical; charge/current etc watch your thoughts- diagnostic imaging and the brain

analyze simple arrangements: How are resistance and power related? http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/circuits/Lesson-3/Power-Revisited

Students can be helped to understand the concepts of voltage and current if you always say “current through” and voltage (or potential difference) across”. Voltmeters are always placed across the device to be measured and ammeters must always be placed in series. (Ammeters can be ruined when students incorrectly place them across a device being tested.

http://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/

Sticky Tape

Ohm's Law

PII.5.2 Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the between the amount of current passing through an ohmic device and the amount of voltage (i.e. EMF) applied across the device according to Ohm’s Law. Apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the current affects the voltage and vice versa for an ohmic device of known resistance. Ohm interactive
PII.5.3 Describe the slope of the graphical representation of current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current in terms of the resistance of the device.  
PII.5.4 Define and describe a device as ohmic or non-ohmic based on the relationship between the current passing through the device and the voltage across the device based on the shape of the curve of a current vs. voltage or voltage vs. current graphical representation.

Ohms law PBS

Ohms law simulation

PII.5.5 Explain and analyze simple arrangements of electrical components in series and parallel DC circuits in terms of current, resistance, voltage and power. Use Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws to analyze DC circuits.

Circuits interactive

Circuit Builder

Circuit Construction Kit

Standard 6: Magnetism
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PII.6.1 Describe the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic, paramagnetic, and diamagnetic materials on a macroscopic scale and atomic scale. Magnetism basics
PII.6.2 Develop and apply a mathematical representation that describes the relationship between the magnetic field created by a long straight wire carrying an electric current, the magnitude of the current, and the distance to the wire. Magnetic Field Interactive
PII.6.3 Describe the motion of a charged or uncharged particle through a uniform magnetic field. Magnet and Compass
PII.6.4 Determine the magnitude of the magnetic force acting on a charged particle moving through a uniform magnetic field and apply the right hand rule to determine the direction of either the magnetic force or the magnetic field.  
PII.6.5 Describe the practical uses of magnetism in motors, electronic devices, mass spectroscopy, MRIs, and other applications. MRI simulation
Standard 7: Electromagnetic Induction
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PII.7.1 Given the magnitude and direction of a uniform magnetic field, calculate the flux through a specified area in terms of the field magnitude and the size and orientation of the area with respect to the field.  
PII.7.2 Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the rate of change of magnetic flux and the amount of voltage induced in a simple loop circuit according to Faraday’s Law of Induction and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the voltage across the device affects the current through the device. Magnetic Field Lines
PII.7.3 Apply Ohm’s Law, Faraday’s Law, and Lenz’s Law to determine the amount and direction of current induced by a changing magnetic flux in a loop of wire or simple loop circuit.  
Standard 8: Geometric Optics
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PII.8.1 Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationships between the focal length, the image distance and the object distance for planar, converging, and diverging mirrors and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the object distance affects the image distance. Optics Refraction Interactive
PII.8.2 Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationship between the angles of incidence and refraction of monochromatic light passed between two different media and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the angle of incidence affects the angle of refraction. Geometric optics
PII.8.3 Develop graphical, mathematical, and pictorial representations (e.g. ray diagrams) that describe the relationships between the focal length, the image distance, and the object distance for both converging and diverging lenses and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the object distance affects the image distance. Converging Lens interactive
PII.8.4 Describe an image as real or virtual for both a curved mirror and lens system based on the position of the image relative to the optical device.

Refraction of light and image formation

Standard 9: Particle and Wave Nature of Light
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PII.9.1 Develop the relationship among frequency, wavelength, and energy for electromagnetic waves across the entire spectrum. Electromagnetic Spectrum
PII.9.2 Explain how electromagnetic waves interact with matter both as particles (i.e. photons) and as waves and be able to apply the most appropriate model to any particular scenario. Glencoe virtual lab
PII.9.3 Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the frequency of a photon and the kinetic energy of an electron emitted through the photoelectric effect and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the frequency or intensity of light affect the current produced in the photoelectric effect. Photoelectric
PII.9.4 Describe the slope of the graphical representation of the kinetic energy of a photoelectron vs. frequency in terms of Planck’s constant.  
PII.9.5 Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the wavelength of monochromatic light, spacing between slits, distance to screen, and interference pattern produced for a double-slit scenario and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing any of the independent variables affects the position of the bright fringes. Color vision simulation
PII.9.6 Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the angle between two polarizing filters and the intensity of light passed through the filters from an unpolarized light source and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the angle between polarizing filters affects the intensity of light passing through both filters. Polarization of light
Standard 10: Modern Physics
Indiana Academic Standard Activities/Labs/Simulations (Examples and Ideas)
PII.10.1 Describe the Standard Model and explain the composition and decay of subatomic particles using the Standard Model and Feynman diagrams.

History of Rutherford’s model:

Atom Builder Activity (requires shockwave)

Nuclear Physics videos and Activities

Atomic and Nuclear Physics Activities PDF

Nuclear Physics Information and Experiments/ABC’s of Nuclear Science

Nuclear Physics Information and Experiments/ABC’s of Nuclear Science 2

PII.10.2 Explain the stability of the nucleus considering the electromagnetic repulsion in the nucleus and how forces govern binding energy and radioactive decay for different elements.  
PII.10.3 Qualitatively compare and contrast how particle interactions, fission, and fusion can convert matter into energy and energy into matter, and calculate the relative amounts of matter and energy in such processes.  
PII.10.4 Apply the conservation of mass, conservation of charge and conservation of linear momentum principles to describe the results of a radioactive particle undergoing either alpha or beta decay.

Impulse, Momentum, and the Physics of Football

Linear Momentum

Circus Physics (linear momentum)

Collision Lab

Understanding Car Crashes

Conservation of Momentum

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