Creative Arts Foundation: 1 - Music

Topic: CA1.1 - Demonstrate creative music expression

Even before birth, children respond to music as a soothing mechanism. Children use creative music expression to process feelings, complex emotions, and life experiences. Musical skills develop when children are exposed to musical concepts, instruments, and a variety of music and sounds.

The development of creative music expression leads to:
*Understanding concepts such as rhythm, counting, patterns, and cause and effect
*Auditory processing skills
*Language development
*Collaboration
*Gross and fine motor development (e.g. using various parts of the body to play instruments)

Looking Ahead to Kindergarten Family Engagement Special Populations
Starting in kindergarten and throughout first and second grade, students will work to understand music's expressive qualities (such as softer/louder, higher/lower, faster/slower, same/different) using music vocabulary (K-2 LR.5.2.1). Students will sing simple songs with expressive qualities, varied tonalities, and meters (K-2 P.7.2.2). Additionally, they will begin to audiate and accurately speak or sing familiar and unfamiliar rhymes and songs with varied forms, tempi, meters, and/or tonalities (K-2 LR.4.2.1). Students will also accurately play a variety of classroom instruments alone and with others using appropriate technique (K-2 P.8.2.1). Encourage families to:

*Identify sounds during everyday activities (e.g. sounds while going for a walk).
*Attend opportunities in the community to see live music when possible.
*Create musical instruments using flexible thinking (e.g. pots and pans as drums).
*Engage with their child in familiar songs and chants.

Educators can:

*Provide opportunities and materials that are accessible to all children (e.g. ensuring the musical instruments are accessible to children with varying mobility or provide adaptations).
*Consider the use of visual supports throughout the environment.
*For DLL, engage with families to incorporate music that reflects their language and culture.

Powerful Practices
Across all developmental stages, educators can:

*Play a variety of appropriate music daily in an environment that encourages expression (e.g. music from various cultures).
*Intentionally select and play music at times throughout the day (i.e. avoid having music on all day as “background noise”).
*Call attention to various sounds in the environment (e.g. “ I hear birds chirping outside!”).
*Provide diverse options of noise making materials in various centers throughout the environment (e.g. home made simple instruments, rhythm sticks, bells, etc.).
*Model and encourage the use of music as a language to express thoughts, ideas and emotions.
*Sing with children at various times of the day (e.g. during transitions, washing hands, routine care for infants, etc.).
*Use consistent songs and fingerplays so that children can become familiar with them.
*Expose children to books that have lyrics or musical patterns (e.g. Wheels on the Bus).
*Look for opportunities to expose children to live music (e.g. inviting parents in to play guitar).

Infant

Model responding to music and incorporate fingerplays throughout the day

Demonstrate simple movements (e.g. clapping, patting legs, stomping, etc.)

Imitate vocalizations playfully with infants (i.e. responding to sounds infants make)

Make sounds for movements (e.g. “Wee!” when a child goes down the slide)

Explain environmental sounds to infant (e.g. “Oh! That was loud. The door slammed shut.”)

Younger Toddler
Model responding to music and incorporate fingerplays throughout the day

Use body parts to make sounds and music (e.g. clapping, patting the legs, stomping, snapping fingers, etc.)

Make sounds for movements (e.g. “Wee!” when a child goes down the slide)

Intentionally point out when sounds are similar or different (e.g. “This is really quiet, and this one is REALLY LOUD!”)

Older Toddler
Model responding to music and incorporate fingerplays throughout the day

Use body parts to make sounds and music (e.g. clapping, patting the legs, stomping, snapping fingers, etc.)

Make sounds for movements (e.g. “Wee!” when a child goes down the slide)

Acknowledge and encourage participation in sound play (e.g. rhyming songs and songs with patterns)

Younger Preschool
Provide materials for children to make their own instruments

Encourage children to create their own songs and use their voice in different ways

Consider “field trips” or guests to play live music for children (e.g. parent comes in to play guitar)

Play music with a variety of qualities (e.g. loud/soft) and ask children what emotions they experience

Explain musical choices throughout the day and provide opportunities for children to select (e.g. “We play slow music at nap time to help us fall asleep!”)

Older Preschool
Provide materials for children to make their own instruments

Encourage children to create their own songs and use their voice in different ways

Consider “field trips” or guests to play live music for children (e.g. parent comes in to play guitar)

Play music with a variety of qualities (e.g. loud/soft) and ask children what emotions they experience

Explain musical choices throughout the day and provide opportunities for children to select (e.g. “We play slow music at nap time to help us fall asleep!”)