English Language Arts Foundation: 2 - Early Reading

Topic: ELA2.3 - Demonstrate awareness and understanding of concepts of print

Concepts of print is the ability to demonstrate awareness and understanding of the function of print.

The development of concepts of print leads to the ability to:
*Understand how print is read
*Demonstrate how print is read
*Understand that print carries meaning

Looking Ahead to Kindergarten Family Engagement Special Populations
In kindergarten, students will recognize that written words are made up of sequences of letters (K.RF.2.2). They will also read emergent reader texts, maintaining an appropriate pace and using self-correcting strategies while reading (K.RF.5). Lastly, students will demonstrate understanding that print moves from left to right, across the page, and from top to bottom (K.RF.2.1). Encourage families to:

*Visit their public library as a family.
*Talk to their child about what they are reading and why (e.g. “I am reading the directions on this box to know how to make this cake.”).
*Read to their children at home and ask their children questions while reading (e.g. “What do you think will happen?”).
*Take advantage of neighborhood locations they frequent and point out words (e.g. "Here is the cheese we want. This is the word 'cheese' on the package.”).
*Consider using magnetic capital and lowercase letters on the fridge or a cookie sheet message board (e.g. their name, "I love you!" "See you later").

Educators can:

*Allow print to be in different textures, sounds, interesting vocabulary, and in different languages.

Powerful Practices
Across all developmental stages, educators can:

*Create an environment that is rich in print materials.
*Label the environment in a variety of ways using pictures and words that are familiar to children (e.g. their names).
*Rotate books in the environment.
*Provide daily access to books for individual use.
*Model how print is read.
*Give ample opportunity for children to encounter different types of print.
*Provide opportunities for children to look at print independently, one-on-one, and in a whole group setting.

Infant

Consistently provide infant with board or cloth books (that can be cleaned and mouthed) with a variety of real pictures and textures

Model how print is read (e.g. how book is held and pages are turned)

Draw awareness to what you are reading and writing during the day (e.g. “I am writing down what you ate for lunch.”)

Younger Toddler
Consistently provide child with board or cloth books (that can be cleaned and mouthed) with a variety of real pictures and textures

Model how print is read (e.g. how book is held and pages are turned)

Draw awareness to what you are reading and writing during the day (e.g. “I am writing down what you ate for lunch.”)

Older Toddler
Provide child with books that have interesting language, rhythms, and sounds

Model how print is read (e.g. left to right, top to bottom) by following along with your finger as you read

Display and point out each child’s name in a variety of places for a variety of purposes in the environment

Draw awareness to what you are reading and writing during the day (e.g. “I am writing down what you ate for lunch.”)

Younger Preschool
Engage child in reading books that have interesting language, rhythm, and sounds (e.g. pointing to print as it’s read)

Model how print is read (e.g. talk about front cover, spine, author, illustrator)

Track words in a book from left to right, top to bottom, and page to page when reading to child individually

Older Preschool
Engage child in reading books that have interesting language, rhythm, and sounds (e.g. pointing to print as it’s read)

Encourage child to talk about and demonstrate how print is read (e.g. left to right, top to bottom, front cover, spine, author, illustrator)