English Language Arts Foundation: 2 - Early Reading

Topic: ELA2.4 - Demonstrate comprehension

The ability to comprehend text allows readers to absorb, analyze, and make sense of what they are reading. As the child grows, so does their language and vocabulary, and they can become more engaged in books through talking about illustrations, answering questions about the story, role playing their favorite book, and retelling their favorite story.

Looking Ahead to Kindergarten Family Engagement Special Populations
In kindergarten, students will actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding (K.RL.1). With support, students will ask and answer questions about main topics, and key details in a text heard or read (K.RL.2.1). Lastly, with support, students will retell familiar stories, poems, and nursery rhymes, including key details (K.RL.2.2). Encourage families to:

*Read books selected by their child together and ask questions about what is happening in the book.
*Ask their child to retell stories in their own words.
*Provide a reading area for their child.
*Listen to their child lead a picture walk of the book or make up a new ending.
*Visit the public library for storytelling events.
*Create a book for or with their child and include familiar people and experiences.
*Share culturally-diverse books or books in their native language with their child’s program.

Educators can:

*Give children the opportunity to preview new vocabulary with picture cards that may or may not have labels.
*Provide story pictures for summary and sequencing.
*For DLL, share a book in their native language to build community within the environment.

Powerful Practices
Across all developmental stages, educators can:

*Create environments that promote reading.
*Give children the opportunity to preview new vocabulary.
*Retell stories with pictures and other manipulatives (e.g. puppets or flannel boards).
*Provide picture summaries of events for children to verbalize.
*Connect information from story to life experiences.
*Engage children in conversation about books.
*Ask families to share culturally-diverse books or books in their native language with the program.

Infant

Frequently engage infant in books (e.g. while reading call attention to parts of the story such as, “Oh! The cat stepped in blueberries.”)

Engage infant in back-and-forth vocal play (i.e. serve and return)

Label facial expressions and emotions when talking with infant

Younger Toddler
Frequently read and reread familiar books with predictable and repeated language

While reading to a child, ask simple open-ended questions about books (e.g. “What do you think will happen?")

Engage in one-on-one reading with child

Older Toddler
Frequently read and reread familiar books and encourage child to engage with the predictable and repeated language

While reading to child, ask simple questions about books

Engage in one-on-one reading with child

Younger Preschool
Encourage child to role play or retell familiar portions of a story or experience (may be inaccurate or not in sequence)

During and after reading a book, ask child who, what, when, where and why questions about the story

Support child’s interest in reading (e.g. rotate books according to child’s interest, have books that are connected to learning experience such as engineering books in the block center)

Older Preschool
Encourage child to role play or retell familiar portions of a story or experience with increased accuracy

During or after reading a book, ask child to recall portions of the story and answer comprehension questions about the story

Support child’s interest in reading (e.g. rotate books according to child’s interest, have books that are connected to specific learning experiences such as engineering books in the block center)