English Language Arts Foundation: 3 - Early Writing

Topic: ELA3.2 - Demonstrate ability to communicate a story

Communicating a story is the ability to respond to a story and verbalize understanding. This instills a love of language in children and motivates them to read.

Communicating a story leads to the ability to:
*Demonstrate drawing and writing as a way to communicate stories
*Engage in genuine and meaningful communication
*Discuss topics that are of interest to them
*Hold conversations with adults and peers in both small and large groups

Looking Ahead to Kindergarten Family Engagement Special Populations
Kindergarten students are expected to write for specific purposes and audiences (K.W.1). Students use words and pictures to narrate a single event or simple story (K.W.3.3). With support, students will apply the writing process to revise writing by adding simple details and review writing (K.W.4). Encourage families to:

*Ask their child to tell them about their art, writing, etc.
*After reading a story, ask their child to tell or draw their favorite part of the story.
*Make books with their child using various instruments (markers, crayons, pencils,etc). As they create, ask questions (e.g. “What is going to happen next?”).
*Ask their child to rewrite/retell the ending of one of their favorite stories.

Educators can:

*Recognize and respond to children’s use of drawings or symbols to engage in conversation, or when responding to a story.
*Consider using a speech to text device to visually demonstrate understanding.
*For DLL, respond in their native language when possible and allow time for a child to process and respond during conversation.

Powerful Practices
Across all developmental stages, educators can:

*Design environments to encourage children's natural development of communication skills.
*Frequently engage children in books.
*Provide opportunities for children to use pictures, letters, and symbols to share ideas.
*Frequently engage children in conversation.
*Respond to a child’s vocalization and communicative gestures.
*Encourage children to use letters, numbers, and symbols without the expectation of accuracy.
*Display and point out environmental print all around children (signs, labels, logos).
*Prompt children to talk about their writing (picture(s), scribbling, letter approximations, etc.) and take dictation.
*Observe children’s interest during play and prompt meaningful conversations around the topic.

Infant

Attend to and encourage infant’s vocalizations and communicative gestures

Frequently engage infant in books

Change the tone of voice when reading aloud to show emotion and excitement

Younger Toddler
Repeat and expand on what the child says

Model verbalizing and using simple signs to express wants and needs

Frequently engage child in books (i.e. allow children to touch books, turn pages, etc.)

Demonstrate drawing and writing as a way to communicate (e.g. simple labels of child’s work as dictated by the child)

Older Toddler
Engage in genuine and meaningful conversations with child (e.g. prompting conversations about child’s family or interests)

Demonstrate writing as a way to communicate (e.g. write down what child says about their work)

Connect conversations with child to previous experiences (e.g. what the child did at home that weekend, the experiences at school from earlier in the day, a book or story that was read/told, etc.)

Younger Preschool
Engage in genuine and meaningful conversations with child (e.g. prompt child to tell more)

Demonstrate writing as a way to communicate (e.g. write down what the child says about their work)

Provide opportunities for child to use pictures, letters, and symbols to communicate a story (e.g. felt boards)

Provide opportunities for children to write creatively using inventive spelling

Consider a class journaling project where an item travels between home and school

Older Preschool
Engage in genuine and meaningful conversations with child (e.g. encourage detailed description of familiar objects or activities)

Demonstrate writing as a way to communicate (e.g. educator writes story as children tell it)

Provide opportunities for child to use pictures, letters, and symbols to share an idea (e.g. writing letters to peers)

Provide opportunities for children to write creatively using inventive spelling

Consider a class journaling project where an item travels between home and school