11-12.LH.2.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

Learning Outcome:

11-12.LH.1.1: Read and comprehend history/social studies texts within a range of complexity appropriate for grades 11-CCR independently and proficiently by the end of grade 12.

I Can Statements Question Stems
-I can differentiate between a primary and a secondary source.
-I can analyze a primary or secondary source.
-I can analyze the text features of primary and secondary sources.
-I can identify the central idea of a text.
-I can determine the supporting details that best support the author’s purpose.
-I can identify the author’s purpose using textual evidence.
-I can cite specific evidence to support my analysis of both primary and secondary sources.

-What is a primary source?
-How can you determine if the source is primary?
-What is a secondary source?
-How can you determine if the source is secondary?
-What is the purpose of this text? What evidence from the text supports your conclusion?
-How does the context in which this piece was written contribute your interpretation of it?
-For what audience was this text originally intended? What was the purpose or goal of the writer at the time of publication?
-What is the central idea of this text? What details contribute to that idea?

Academic Vocabulary

primary source
secondary source
textual evidence
cite
detail

Looking Back Looking Ahead

9-10.LH.2.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

Practical Examples, Standards, and Digital Resources

Reading Examples Writing Examples Speaking and Listening Examples
-Analyze a text set that includes both primary and secondary sources. For example in Government class, the students could read and synthesize several short examples about laws that include the textbook explanation (secondary source), a step-by-step infographic, and an actual law that would interest or apply to students (primary source). -Students compare and contrast the ideas of an Enlightenment thinker with an American thinker or document, such as Thomas Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence. -Students compare and contrast the ideas of an Enlightenment thinker with an American thinker or document, such as Thomas Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence.
Reading Standards Writing Standards Speaking and Listening Standards
11-12.RN.1
11-12.RN 4.2
11-12.RN. 4.3
11-12.W.5  11-12.SL.1
11.12.SL.2.2
Digital Resources
The Enlightenment:
https://www.learner.org/courses/amerhistory/pdf/Enlightenment_LOne.pdf

Purdue Owl Formatting Guide:
https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html

Nearpod.com

Quizlet.live

English Learner Considerations

The English Learner considerations, which were written by Indiana EL teachers, are meant to increase engagement and support growth for ELs.They are designed to support the standards and curriculum you are currently using. The following are recommendations of best practices to assist educators in making language more accessible for English Learners. Educators should adapt strategies based upon a student’s proficiency level and ensure that content is age-appropriate.

Additional strategies and the guiding principles regarding literacy instruction for English Learners.

Beginning Intermediate Advanced

Special Education Considerations

The special education considerations, which were written by Indiana special education teachers, are meant to increase engagement and support growth for students in special education. This is not an exhaustive list of strategies, but these supports will help you make literacy instruction more accessible for students. Remember to adapt these to the needs of your students and ensure that you are creating opportunities for all students to engage with rigorous content.

Guiding principles regarding literacy instruction for students in special education.