11-12.SL.3.1

Synthesize multiple sources of information presented in diverse media and formats in order to make informed
decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and accounting for any
discrepancies among the data.

Learning Outcome:

Listen actively and adjust the use of spoken language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

I Can Statements Question Stems
-I can integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media and formats in order to make informed decisions and solve problems.
-I can evaluate the credibility and accuracy of sources and note any discrepancies in the data.

-How do you determine if a source is credible?
-How do you determine if a source is accurate?
-How do you determine if a source is unbiased and relevant?
-How does the speaker use diverse media?
-What is the effect of using different formats to deliver the information?
-What is the purpose of the presentation?
-What decisions were made as a result of the information presented? Was there a change in your thinking?
-Did you note any discrepancies in the data?
-How do the discrepancies in data affect your interpretation of the source?
-How could this information help solve a problem?

Academic Vocabulary

accuracy
credible
discrepancy
integrate
media
research

Looking Back Looking Ahead

Practical Examples, Standards, and Digital Resources

Reading Examples Writing Examples Speaking and Listening Examples
-While researching for credible information for a paper or presentation, require that students evaluate and use a specific number of credible sources, such as the following: a TEDTalk, a YouTube video, a blog post, a scholarly article, a documentary film, a newscast, a newspaper article, a case study, a published song. Have students create an ethos protocol checklist for information found on the Intenet and in databases to determine its suitability for use as an academic source. The protocol might include elements such as the following: Is an author listed? Are the author's credentials listed? What information does cross-referencing the author's name provide? Is the sponsoring organization an academic one? If not, is it a governmental agency? If it is a private organization, where does its funding come from? What are the principles or beliefs of the funding organization? Is advertising on the site? Have students discuss their findings with a writing partner and justify in a paragraph the use of their sources based on the criteria they have created. Write an argumentative or informational research projects - students conduct their own primary research through suveys, observations, and interviews.
-Beforehand, assign the three types of primary research to groups, and have the groups create presentations about the definition, purposes, methodology, and pros and cons of each type of primary resarch.
-Each student in the group can be responsible fore a particular section of the presentation.
-Students research and discuss the ethics of conducting each type of primary research as well.
-Each group will present its findings to the class.
-Encourage students to discuss with their writing cohort the best type of primary research tool they will need to create to garner the information they will need for their paper.
Reading Standards Writing Standards Speaking and Listening Standards
11-12.RN.2.1
11-12.RN.3.3
11-12.RN.4.1
11-12.RN.4.2
11-12.RV.1
11-12.RV.2.1
11-12.RV.3.2

11-12.W.1
11-12.W.3.1
11-12.W.3.2
11-12.W.4
1-12.W.5
11-12.W.6.1
11-12.W.6.2

 

11-12.SL.1
11-12.SL.2.1
11-12.SL.2.3
11-12.SL.2.4
11-12.SL.3.1
11-12.SL.3.2
11-12.SL.4.1
11-12.SL.4.2

Digital Resources

-ELA Bookmarks:

-For Types of Primary Research:

-Assessing Internet Resources:

English Learner Considerations

The English Learner considerations, which were written by Indiana EL teachers, are meant to increase engagement and support growth for ELs.They are designed to support the standards and curriculum you are currently using. The following are recommendations of best practices to assist educators in making language more accessible for English Learners. Educators should adapt strategies based upon a student’s proficiency level and ensure that content is age-appropriate.

Additional strategies and the guiding principles regarding literacy instruction for English Learners.

Beginning Intermediate Advanced

-use appropriate rate of speech
-expect one word answers and responses
-sequence ideas (pre-teach sequence words)
-allow students to use conversation frames or talk moves
-do multiple rounds of pair and share over same prompt
-collaborative discussions with sentence starters or visual cues
-watch models (including examples and non-examples)
-present basic components and parts with pictures

-expect sentence level discourse
-evaluate information from social and academic conversations
-use graphic organizers to take notes, practice determining important information
-use talk moves and conversation frames
-do multiple rounds of pair and share over same prompt
-have collaborative discussions with sentence starters

-expect longer, flowing discourse
-do multiple rounds of pair and share over same prompt
-distinguish between multiple-meaning oral words
-use specific and technical language (provide word bank, visuals, realia, google image search)
-gradual release
-explain content related views and concepts

Special Education Considerations

The special education considerations, which were written by Indiana special education teachers, are meant to increase engagement and support growth for students in special education. This is not an exhaustive list of strategies, but these supports will help you make literacy instruction more accessible for students. Remember to adapt these to the needs of your students and ensure that you are creating opportunities for all students to engage with rigorous content.

Guiding principles regarding literacy instruction for students in special education.

Strategy Examples

Present a video to support the standards being taught

Students collaborate in small groups to discuss what they learned

Present a piece of writing to classmates

Classmates are actively listening and jotting notes about the presentation 

Provide fill in the blank notes for students

Project notes in front of class and have a set in front of students

Teach social skills associated with speaking and listening

Model appropriate body position for speaking

Use picture to show what is required for proper listening and speaking

Identify audience, tone, and mood for presentation 

Use checklist for student to ensure a presentation is appropriate for the audience

Use a checklist to monitor tone and mood