1.RL.4.1

Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.

Learning Outcome:

With support, read and comprehend literature that is grade-level appropriate.

I Can Statements Question Stems
-I can use the illustrations and details to describe characters in a story.
-I can use the illustrations and details to describe the setting in a story.
-I can use the illustrations and details to describe events in a story.

-Who are the characters in the story?
-How does the character feel? How do you know?
-Where can we look to find details about the story’s characters?
-What is the setting? How do you know?
-Where can we look to find details about the story’s setting?
-What are the events in the story?
-Where can we look to find details about the story’s events?

Academic Vocabulary

character
detail
event
illustration
setting

Practical Examples, Standards, and Digital Resources

Reading Examples Writing Examples Speaking and Listening Examples
-Have students Think, Pair, Share to discuss the characters emotions, various settings, or story events and use details from the illustration or text to support their thinking.

-Students write or draw the character's actions at various points in a story. -Students discuss how the characters, setting, or events affect the story.
Reading Standards Writing Standards Speaking and Listening Standards
1.RL.2.2 1.RL.2.3 1.W.3.3  1.SL.3.1
Digital Resources

English Learner Considerations

The English Learner considerations, which were written by Indiana EL teachers, are meant to increase engagement and support growth for ELs.They are designed to support the standards and curriculum you are currently using. The following are recommendations of best practices to assist educators in making language more accessible for English Learners. Educators should adapt strategies based upon a student’s proficiency level and ensure that content is age-appropriate.

Additional strategies and the guiding principles regarding literacy instruction for English Learners.

Beginning Intermediate Advanced

-allow visuals in hand
-provide realia
-use picture books
-provide high-interest texts
-provide audiobooks
-provide modified texts

-post visuals in classroom for reference
-provide high-interest texts
-provide audiobooks
-provide modified texts

-provide visuals if needed
-provide high-interest texts

Special Education Considerations

The special education considerations, which were written by Indiana special education teachers, are meant to increase engagement and support growth for students in special education. This is not an exhaustive list of strategies, but these supports will help you make literacy instruction more accessible for students. Remember to adapt these to the needs of your students and ensure that you are creating opportunities for all students to engage with rigorous content.

Guiding principles regarding literacy instruction for students in special education.

Strategy  Examples
Offer multiple ways to present text  Read alouds 
Partner reading
Audio text
Video read aloud
Repeated reading of same text
Picture walk of story  Model how illustrations can raise questions about the story
Prompt students to notice important parts of the illustrations that move the story forward
Highlight important vocabulary words in the text that are also used in the picture walk
Use a storyboard to retell a story Give story segments and allow students to sequence
Fill in sections of storyboard ahead of time but have students fill in empty spaces
Give checklist of times to include in story retelling
Accept oral retelling of story
Use plot diagram to assist in including all parts of story retell
Identify character traits in small group discussion Use a chart to record character actions and the trait they represent
Draw a picture of the setting  Include a checklist of items to include in the illustration
Allow students to use technology or magazines to gather pictures
Read part of a story, stop, and ask the class what could happen next Turn and talk with a partner and share predictions
Use visuals to prompt turn taking and when to talk when partner reading
Have students record predictions on a whiteboard or answer sheet before speaking aloud
Give choice for how students respond to the text Accept oral answer 
Provide fill in the blank answers
Accept small group answers
Model how to answer before having students answer
Immerse students with songs and poems Use visuals to prompt student engagement 
Use pictures with the lyrics or poems to encourage engagement and comprehension