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The Indiana Department of Education's goal is to increase literacy achievement for all students in Indiana.

 

To learn more about how to use the Literacy Framework, watch this short video.

 

Guiding Principles of Literacy Instruction:

  • Literacy propels independent thinking, reading, writing, speaking, listening, and new literacies.
  • Standards-based and disciplinary literacy instruction accelerate student gains. 
  • Literacy is a fundamental part of instruction in all disciplines.
  • Teachers as adaptive experts have the most impact on student learning.
  • Evidence-based instructional approaches transform an emergent reader into a skilled reader and a lifelong learner.
  • Administrators are change agents and have the power to create and to support a culture of literacy.
Click here to select one or multiple grades.
Select one Content Area at a time.
Search for key words within each standard's description.
Standard Grade Area Description
PS.5

6, 7, 8

Math

Use appropriate tools strategically. Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Mathematically proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. Mathematically proficient students identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content, and use them to pose or solve problems. They use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts and to support the development of learning mathematics. They use technology to contribute to concept development, simulation, representation, reasoning, communication and problem solving.

PS.5

9, 10, 11, 12

Math

Use appropriate tools strategically. Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Mathematically proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. Mathematically proficient students identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content, and use them to pose or solve problems. They use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts and to support the development of learning mathematics. They use technology to contribute to concept development, simulation, representation, reasoning, communication and problem solving.

1.ML.2.1

1

Media Literacy

Demonstrate understanding of media by asking and answering appropriate questions about what is read, heard, or viewed.

1.RF.2.3

1

Reading Foundations

Recognize the components of a sentence (e.g., capitalization, first word, ending punctuation).

1.RF.2.4

1

Reading Foundations

Learn and apply knowledge of alphabetical order.

1.RF.3.1

1

Reading Foundations

Produce rhyming words.

1.RF.3.2

1

Reading Foundations

Blend sounds, including consonant blends, to produce single- and multi-syllable words.

1.RF.3.3

1

Reading Foundations

Orally blend sounds in words.

1.RF.3.4

1

Reading Foundations

Distinguish beginning, middle (medial), and final sounds in single-syllable words.

1.RF.3.5

1

Reading Foundations

Segment the individual sounds in one-syllable words.

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