1.G.2

Distinguish between defining attributes of two- and three-dimensional shapes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size). Create and draw two-dimensional shapes with defining attributes.

I Can Statements Academic Vocabulary

*I can describe what makes a two and three-dimensional shape.

*I can create and draw two-dimensional shapes.

.

Two-dimensional
Three-dimensional

Looking Back Looking Ahead

*Compare two- and three-dimensional using informal language to describe their similarities, and differences. (MA.K.G.2)

*Identify, describe, and classify two- and three-dimensional shapes according to the number and shape of faces and the number of sides and/or vertices. (MA.2.G.1)

Clarifying Examples and Digital Resources
Click here for clarifying examples and digital resources aligned to Indiana standards. These are intended to expand each standard to support instruction in the classroom as evidenced by the Eight Mathematics Teaching Practices put forth by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM).

Universal Strategies for Struggling Mathematicians

The following recommendations are strategies designed to support the standards and curriculum you are currently using. These best practices will assist educators in adapting instruction to ensure that you are creating engaging and rigorous opportunities for all students.

K-2 Geometry Strategies and Examples

Use of manipulatives

  • Tangrams
  • Putty/clay/play dough
  • Examples of 2D and 3D shape
  • Real world examples of shapes
  • Fraction bars/circles

Tracing shapes

  • Sand
  • Template on paper
  • Make your own shape
  • Highlighter
  • Grid paper

English Learner Considerations

The English Learner considerations, which were written by Indiana EL teachers, are meant to increase engagement and support growth for English Learners. They are designed to support the standards and curriculum you are currently using. The following are recommendations of best practices to assist educators in making language more accessible for English Learners. Educators should adapt strategies based upon a student’s proficiency level and ensure that content is age-appropriate.

Beginning
  • Explicitly teach content vocabulary using visuals
  • Allow use of a bilingual dictionary and native language to facilitate understanding
  • Use and reference a Math Word Wall with visuals and symbols
  • Use of manipulatives with visuals for instruction and procedures
  • Use different grouping strategies to maximize learning, collaboration, and oral language practice
  • Implement Modeling techniques such as: I do, We do, You do
  • Provide sentence frames and a word bank
  • Use gestures and signaling to make content comprehensible
  • Simplify dense language
  • Use of realia to enhance learning concepts
Intermediate
  • Explicitly teach content vocabulary using visuals
  • Allow use of a bilingual dictionary and native language to facilitate understanding
  • Use and reference a Math Word Wall with visuals and symbols
  • Use of manipulatives with visuals for instruction and procedures
  • Use different grouping strategies to maximize learning, collaboration, and oral language practice
  • Implement Modeling techniques such as: I do, We do, You do
  • Provide sentence frames and a word bank
  • Use gestures and signaling to make content comprehensible
  • Use of realia to enhance learning concepts
Advanced
  • Use different grouping strategies to maximize learning, collaboration, and oral language practice
  • Implement Modeling techniques such as: I do, We do, You do
  • Explicitly teach content vocabulary using visuals

Special Education Considerations

The Special Education considerations, which were written by Indiana special education teachers, are meant to increase engagement and support growth for students in special education. This is not an exhaustive list of strategies, but these supports will help you make math instruction more accessible for students. Educators should adapt strategies to the needs of your students and ensure that you are creating opportunities for all students to engage with rigorous content.

Universal Strategies for Struggling Learners

Use of manipulatives

  • Cubes
  • Anything tangible which can be manipulated
  • Number cards
  • Hundreds or 120 chart
  • Building own book up through 1000 (may vary by grade)
  • Straws-bundling

Model/Drawing a picture

  • 1 to 1 correspondence of number to object (object representation)
  • 10 frames
  • Place value blocks
  • Identify a set/groups
  • Teacher modeling-think alouds-repeated

Flash cards

  • Folding numbers known with unknown numbers

Visual cues

  • Posters with vocabulary
  • Picture dictionary

Engaging touch points

  • TouchStrip
  • TouchPoints

Daily reinforcement

  • Calendar time
  • Community circle

Scaffolded resources

  • Premade notes with fill-in-the-blanks
  • Premade charts with fill-in-the-blanks