To learn more about how to use the Math Framework, watch this short video.

 

Guiding Principles of Mathematics Instruction:

  • Mathematical proficiency is defined by conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, strategic competence, adaptive reasoning, and productive disposition (National Research Council, 2001).
  • Mathematical proficiency drives independent thinking, reasoning, and problem-solving.
  • Mathematical proficiency is the foundation for careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and it is increasingly becoming the foundation for careers outside of STEM (NCTM, 2018)
  • Effective mathematics teaching “engages students in meaningful learning through individual and collaborative experiences that promote their ability to make sense of mathematical ideas and reason mathematically” (NCTM, 2014).
  • Standards-based instruction accelerates student gains.
  • Students construct mathematical knowledge through exploration, discussion, and reflection.
  • Teachers are facilitators of student learning, as they engage students in rich tasks. Administrators are change agents and have the power to create and to support a culture of mathematical proficiency.
Click here to select one or multiple grades.
Select one Content Area or High School course at a time.
Search for key words within each standard's description.
Standard Grade Area/Subject Description
QR.RP.6

High School

H.S. Quantitative Reasoning

Determine the constant of proportionality in proportional situations (both real-life and mathematical), leading to a symbolic model for the situation (i.e. an equation based upon a rate of change, y = kx).

QR.S.1

High School

H.S. Quantitative Reasoning

Analyze statistical information from studies, surveys, and polls (including when reported in condensed form or using summary statistics) to make informed judgments as to the validity of claims or conclusions, such as when interpreting and comparing the results of polls using margin of error.

QR.S.2

High School

H.S. Quantitative Reasoning

Identify limitations, strengths, or lack of information in studies, including data collection methods (e.g. sampling, experimental, observational) and possible sources of bias, and identify errors or misuses of statistics to justify particular conclusions.

QR.S.3

High School

H.S. Quantitative Reasoning

Create (with and without technology) and use visual displays of real world data, such as charts, tables and graphs.

QR.S.4

High School

H.S. Quantitative Reasoning

Interpret and analyze visual representations of data, and describe strengths, limitations, and fallacies of various graphical displays.

QR.S.5

High School

H.S. Quantitative Reasoning

Read, interpret, and make decisions about data summarized numerically using measures of center and spread, in tables, and in graphical displays (line graphs, bar graphs, scatterplots, and histograms), e.g., explain why the mean may not represent a typical salary; explain the difference between bar graphs and histograms; critique a graphical display by recognizing that the choice of scale can distort information.

QR.S.6

High School

H.S. Quantitative Reasoning

Summarize, represent, and interpret data sets on a single count or measurement variable using plots and statistics appropriate to the shape of the data distribution to represent it.

QR.S.7

High School

H.S. Quantitative Reasoning

Compare center, shape, and spread of two or more data sets and interpret the differences in context.

QR.S.8

High School

H.S. Quantitative Reasoning

Use properties of distributions, including uniform and normal distributions, to analyze data and answer questions.

QR.S.9

High School

H.S. Quantitative Reasoning

Recognize when data are normally distributed and use the mean and standard deviation of the data to fit it to a normal distribution.

TR.CO.1

High School

H.S. Trigonometry

Determine how the graph of a parabola changes if a, b and c changes in the equation y = a(x – b)2 + c. Find an equation for a parabola when given sufficient information.

TR.CO.2

High School

H.S. Trigonometry

Derive the equation of a parabola given a focus and directrix.

TR.CO.3

High School

H.S. Trigonometry

Derive the equation of a circle of given center and radius using the Pythagorean Theorem; complete the square to find the center and radius of a circle given by an equation.

TR.CO.4

High School

H.S. Trigonometry

Derive the equations of ellipses and hyperbolas given the foci, using the fact that the sum or difference of distances from the foci is constant.

TR.CO.5

High School

H.S. Trigonometry

Graph conic sections. Identify and describe features like center, vertex or vertices, focus or foci, directrix, axis of symmetry, major axis, minor axis, and eccentricity.

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