To learn more about how to use the Math Framework, watch this short video.

 

Guiding Principles of Mathematics Instruction:

  • Mathematical proficiency is defined by conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, strategic competence, adaptive reasoning, and productive disposition (National Research Council, 2001).
  • Mathematical proficiency drives independent thinking, reasoning, and problem-solving.
  • Mathematical proficiency is the foundation for careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and it is increasingly becoming the foundation for careers outside of STEM (NCTM, 2018)
  • Effective mathematics teaching “engages students in meaningful learning through individual and collaborative experiences that promote their ability to make sense of mathematical ideas and reason mathematically” (NCTM, 2014).
  • Standards-based instruction accelerates student gains.
  • Students construct mathematical knowledge through exploration, discussion, and reflection.
  • Teachers are facilitators of student learning, as they engage students in rich tasks. Administrators are change agents and have the power to create and to support a culture of mathematical proficiency.
Click here to select one or multiple grades.
Select one Content Area or High School course at a time.
Search for key words within each standard's description.
Standard Grade Area/Subject Description
3.DA.1

3

Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability

Create scaled picture graphs, scaled bar graphs, and frequency tables to represent a data set—including data collected through observations, surveys, and experiments—with several categories. Solve one- and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems regarding the data and make predictions based on the data.

3.DA.2

3

Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability

Generate measurement data by measuring lengths with rulers to the nearest quarter of an inch. Display the data by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in appropriate units, such as whole numbers, halves, or quarters.

3.G.1

3

Geometry and Measurement

Identify and describe the following: cube, sphere, prism, pyramid, cone, and cylinder.

3.G.2

3

Geometry and Measurement

Understand that shapes (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize and draw rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals. Recognize and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.

3.G.3

3

Geometry and Measurement

Identify, describe and draw points, lines and line segments using appropriate tools (e.g., ruler, straightedge, and technology), and use these terms when describing two-dimensional shapes.

3.G.4

3

Geometry and Measurement

Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole (1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/6, 1/8).

3.M.1

3

Geometry and Measurement

Estimate and measure the mass of objects in grams (g) and kilograms (kg) and the volume of objects in quarts (qt), gallons (gal), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step real-world problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units (e.g., by using drawings, such as a beaker with a measurement scale, to represent the problem).

3.M.2

3

Geometry and Measurement

Choose and use appropriate units and tools to estimate and measure length, weight, and temperature. Estimate and measure length to a quarter-inch, weight in pounds, and temperature in degrees Celsius and Fahrenheit.

3.M.3

3

Geometry and Measurement

Tell and write time to the nearest minute from analog clocks, using a.m. and p.m., and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes.

3.M.4

3

Geometry and Measurement

Find the value of any collection of coins and bills. Write amounts less than a dollar using the ¢ symbol and write larger amounts using the $ symbol in the form of dollars and cents (e.g., $4.59). Solve real-world problems to determine whether there is enough money to make a purchase.

3.M.5

3

Geometry and Measurement

Find the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by modeling with unit squares, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths. Identify and draw rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters.

3.M.6

3

Geometry and Measurement

Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole-number side lengths to solve real-world problems and other mathematical problems, and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning.

3.M.7

3

Geometry and Measurement

Find perimeters of polygons given the side lengths or by finding an unknown side length.

3.NS.1

3

Number Sense

Use words, models, standard form and expanded form to represent and show equivalent forms of whole numbers up to 10,000.

3.NS.2

3

Number Sense

Compare two whole numbers up to 10,000 using >, =, and < symbols.

Pages