Posted: Thu, 09/13/2018 - 10:03am Updated: Fri, 11/09/2018 - 1:33pm

Involved Families Overview

In schools with involved families, the entire staff builds strong external relationships with the community and with students' caregivers. In such schools, family members are seen as partners in helping students learn, and their input and participation in advancing the school's mission is valued. 

 

Involved Families Indicators

  • Teacher-Family Member Trust: In schools with strong teacher-caregiver trust, teachers view caregivers as partners in improving student learning.
  • Family Member Involvement: In schools with strong caregiver involvement, caregivers participate in school activities related to their child's academic growth.
  • Family Member Influence on Decision Making: In schools with strong caregiver influence on decision making, the school actively creates opportunities for caregivers to participate in developing academic programs and influencing school curricula.
Involved Families Tool Aligned Indicator(s) Source
Teaching Diverse Learners Teacher-Family Member Trust, Family Member Involvement The Education Alliance at Brown University
Bringing Attendance Home: Engaging Parents in Preventing Chronic Absence Teacher-Family Member Trust, Family Member Involvement Attendance Works 
Family Engagement Toolkit Teacher-Family Member Trust, Family Member Involvement, Family Member Influence on Decision Making Build Initiative 
Designing Community Partnerships to Expand Student Learning: A Toolkit Family Member Involvement, Family Member Influence on Decision Making The Colorado Education Initiative, Generation Schools Network, and 2Revolutions
Postsecondary Success Toolkit - Engaging Students and Families Teacher-Family Member Trust, Family Member Involvement Network for College Success at The University of Chicago
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