Guiding Principles of Science Instruction:

  • Science instruction should be three-dimensional, implementing the science and engineering process standards and applying the cross cutting concepts to deepen understanding of core ideas. (NSTA, 2019)
  • Science instruction should foster independent thinking, reasoning, and problem-solving.
  • Standards-based instruction accelerates student gains.
  • Students construct scientific knowledge through exploration, discussion, and reflection.
  • Teachers are facilitators of student learning, as they engage students in rich tasks. Administrators are change agents and have the power to create and to support a culture of scientific inquiry.
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Select one Content Area or High School course at a time.
Search for key words within each standard's description.
Standard Grade Area/Subject Description
PII.1.3

High School

Physical Science For a system consisting of two objects moving in two dimensions with no net external forces applied, apply the principles of conservation of linear momentum and of mechanical energy to quantitatively predict changes in the linear momentum, velocity, and kinetic energy after the interaction between the two objects.
PII.1.4

High School

Physical Science Classify interactions between two objects moving in two dimensions as elastic, inelastic, and completely inelastic.
PII.10.1

High School

Physical Science Describe the Standard Model and explain the composition and decay of subatomic particles using the Standard Model and Feynman diagrams.
PII.10.2

High School

Physical Science Explain the stability of the nucleus considering the electromagnetic repulsion in the nucleus and how forces govern binding energy and radioactive decay for different elements.
PII.10.3

High School

Physical Science Qualitatively compare and contrast how particle interactions, fission, and fusion can convert matter into energy and energy into matter, and calculate the relative amounts of matter and energy in such processes.
PII.10.4

High School

Physical Science Apply the conservation of mass, conservation of charge, and conservation of linear momentum principles to describe the results of a radioactive particle undergoing either alpha or beta decay.
PII.10.5

High School

Physical Science Know and describe how a particle accelerator functions and how current high energy particle physics experiments are being used to develop the Standard Model.
PII.2.1

High School

Physical Science Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship among the temperature, thermal energy, and thermal energy transfer (i.e. heat) in the kinetic molecular theory and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the temperature of a substance affects the motion of the molecules.
PII.2.2

High School

Physical Science Describe the process of the transfer of thermal energy (i.e. heat) that occurs during the heating cycle of a substance from solid to gas and relate the changes in molecular motion to temperature changes that are observed.
PII.2.3

High School

Physical Science Cite evidence from everyday life to describe the transfer of thermal energy by conduction, convection, and radiation.
PII.2.4

High School

Physical Science Develop graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship among the volume, temperature, and number of molecules of an ideal gas in a closed system and the pressure exerted by the system and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing any of those variables affects the others.
PII.2.5

High School

Physical Science Describe the slope of the graphical representation of pressure vs. the product of: the number of particles, temperature of the gas, and inverse of the volume of the gas in terms of the ideal gas constant.
PII.2.6

High School

Physical Science Using PV graphs, qualitatively and quantitatively determine how changes in the pressure, volume, or temperature of an ideal gas allow the gas to do work and classify the work as either done on or done by the gas.
PII.3.1

High School

Physical Science For a static, incompressible fluid, develop and apply graphical and mathematical representations that describe the relationship between the density and the pressure exerted at various positions in the fluid, and apply those representations to qualitatively and quantitatively describe how changing the depth or density affects the pressure.
PII.3.2

High School

Physical Science Qualitatively and quantitatively determine how the density of fluid or volume of fluid displaced is related to the force due to buoyancy acting on either a floating or submerged object as described by Archimedes’ principle of buoyancy.

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